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Paul Karger - (Karger, Paul)

Page history last edited by Jack Daniel 3 years, 4 months ago

IBM Research profile: http://researcher.watson.ibm.com/researcher/view.php?person=us-pkarger

Memorial at IEEE Computer.org: http://www.computer.org/csdl/mags/sp/2010/06/msp2010060005.html

PDF including some references and quotes: http://www.acsac.org/acsa/memoriam/karger.pdf

Obituary at IEEE: http://www.ieee-security.org/Cipher/Newsbriefs/2010/karger.html

 

Inducted into the (US) National Cyber Security Hall of Fame 2016 http://www.cybersecurityhalloffame.com/

From the Cyber Security Hall of Fame page:

High Assurance Architect, Prolific Writer, Creative Inventor

"Upon graduation from MIT, Paul A. Karger was commissioned in the U.S. Air Force. His Multics security work included a classic 1974 paper on penetration testing. He taught at the U.S. Air Force Academy before joining Digital Equipment Corporation, where he worked on multilevel secure systems. 

"He was able to transform requirements and formalisms into designs and implementations. Paul was the lead designer of the VAX VMM security kernel, which was successfully evaluated at TCSEC Class A1. This was a remarkable accomplishment: a product from a major corporation able to enforce mandatory access control policies with high assurance. Paul earned a Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge. He was security architect for the Open Software Foundation. He worked on telephone security at GTE Laboratories. Finally, on the staff of the Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Paul was a founding member of IBM's ethical hacking consulting service. He continued to design commercial systems including a high assurance smart card operating system. 

"Paul was always generous with his time and encyclopedic knowledge of secure systems. His enthusiasm for high assurance development was contagious. Insight, clear thinking, and communication skills allowed him to be a leader in shaping our notions regarding highly trustworthy systems. He never tired of providing examples where security thinking during system design could make a difference. His 1995 paper on privacy threats to intelligent transport systems was a harbinger of dangers ahead if security for GPS and mobile devices was ignored. 

"Prior to his untimely death, Paul was the inventor or co-inventor on 14 U.S. patents and 19 non-U.S. patents. He wrote or co-authored more than 90 technical papers, greatly influencing the evolution of high assurance technology."

 

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